vw id 4 vs ioniq 5
Electric Vehicles For India Electric Bikes id4 vs ioniq 5 | EVs Cross Over

id4 vs ioniq 5 | EVs Cross Over

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vw id 4 vs ioniq 5

The market for EVs oscillates like a pendulum. Two decades ago, dorky, frumpy econocars leased to dorky, frumpy trust fund hippies were the most common electric vehicles; the general public was not required to apply. The most popular EVs a decade ago were pricey, attractive status symbols that, once again, were beyond of reach for everyone but the physically attractive.

However, in recent years, the pace of progress has seemed to slow a little bit as a number of attractive and roomy electric cars have entered the market. These cars combine a practical EV range with prices that are just marginally over average. The 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 and 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 are two examples of these vehicles. They are both family-sized, all-wheel-drive crossovers with a range of roughly 250 miles that are priced between $40,000 and $60,000 with a range of options and trim levels to fit one’s budget.

The ID.4 and Ioniq 5 both compete in the core segment of the automobile industry as compact crossovers, but they do it in very different ways. Those seeking a smooth transition to EVs will be drawn to the former’s cheerful, VW-appropriate appearance, while those who like to clap on 2 and 4, rather than 1 and 3, may prefer the Hyundai’s retro-synthwave exterior and airy, minimalist interior. Clint Simone, the director of video, asked me to help him choose the best option, and, unusually for the two of us, we came to a nearly unanimous decision. But this is where I’m going too fast.

Design

Hyundai: The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 has an overall form that resembles Hyundai’s first passenger car, the 1975 Pony hatchback, while also appearing ultra-modern and retro. That may be seen in the quad square headlights, rectangular, full-width taillight panel, beveled C-pillar, and hatchback’s steeper rake than the door glass. Of course, those features are unmistakably contemporary on the Ioniq 5 thanks to pixelated LEDs front and back, and the bodysides have geometric shapes that would be completely alien to sensibilities from the 1970s.

The size of the item is another consideration. Despite having what appears to be a little hatchback in pictures, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 really has a wheelbase that is longer than that of the three-row Palisade SUV. The all-wheel-drive Limited’s 20-inch sawblade wheels give it a planted stance; the rear-drive Limited and all other grades come with less impressive 19s. Short front and rear overhangs also contribute to this. The Ioniq 5 takes such pleasure in twisting your perception that a short, sloping hood instead looks fashionable and sporty.

Similar in style to the cabin, but far less controversial. The Ioniq 5’s interior is light and spacious thanks to the modular electric platform’s completely flat floor. A 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster is in front of the driver, and a touchscreen display of the same size appears in the same glossy, white bezel. On the center stack, there are touch-sensitive climate controls, a row of hard buttons, and a small cubby at the bottom of the dash. More pixel images can be seen inside on the seats, door panel trim, and the airbag cover for the two-spoke steering wheel.

A movable center console located in-between the front seats serves as both the vehicle’s actual and symbolic focal point. It helps keep things organized and front-row passengers comfortable with an armrest, a large storage pocket, and two cupholders. However, it also glides backward along a set of detents, creating additional room on the front floor for you to spread your knees and unwind. If you wanted to go all-out 1970s, you could even slide across to the passenger side of the vehicle to depart. Pack your belongings properly and you’ll enjoy the open design; the only drawback to this layout is that a stray plastic bottle might easily roll from the passenger side to the pedal box.

Volkswagen: The 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 that we tested is a stylish, well-kept vehicle. The VW ID.4 looks like a villain, but in a not-at-all-scary “Saturday cartoons” kind of manner, like it’s about to burst out a crate of Acme-brand dynamite, with a grin on its face and narrow headlights with eyeball-imitating LEDs inside. The ID.4 is attractive enough aside from its cunning front end, and our tester’s black-painted roof and 20-inch wheels, both of which are a part of the Gradient design package, help it appear lower and leaner than it actually is.

The design was let down by the fairly dull Scale Silver paint, which eliminated the contrast between the bodywork and the brightly polished roof arches. Fortunately, Volkswagen has far more vibrant hues like Kings Red and Dusk Blue for individuals who want to stand out a little bit more. Regardless of paint color, the ID.4 is completely neutral and appealing, even though it blends into the backdrop a lot more than the Ioniq 5 does.

The ID.4’s interior is clean and contemporary, with a slim 5.3-inch digital instrument cluster and a gear selector that twists. A 12.0-inch infotainment display using VW’s most recent infotainment software is mounted high on the dash in its own binnacle. A small strip of touch-sensitive volume and temperature sliders sits immediately below the screen, and a button panel provides rapid access to on-screen features including climate, drive modes, and vehicle settings. Clint and I both agreed that the setup seemed tidy and straightforward, despite the fact that we have difficulties with how those buttons work.

But when it came to the color design for the interior, we disagreed. The dash top and door panel inserts all have the peanut butter-colored soft-touch trim, which breaks up the otherwise monotonously black faux-leather upholstery. Clint thought it all looked out of place, while I thought the color pop was lovely. Those that concur with him would prefer the ID.4 Pro S’s alternate interior color, which features black chairs with light gray accents. Unfortunately, despite how well the Hyundai conceals its less expensive interior components, neither option covers up the harsh plastic door panels and console sides.

Advantages: Hyundai

Comfort:

Hyundai: We anticipated a shaky ride from the Hyundai Ioniq 5 due to its 20-inch wheels and rubber-band sidewalls. Instead, we encountered on-road behavior that muffled minor defects and softened major ones, as well as quiet wind and tire roar when moving quickly. There are minor ocean motions when driving over uneven terrain because the Ioniq 5 defaults to softly sprung comfort over body control, but aside from that, the cabin is a pretty comfy place to spend some miles.

Although the large front bucket seats don’t provide much bolstering for the corners, they are comfortable and supportive for a long drive. Additionally, this Limited’s driver’s seat reclines and includes a leg rest that can be deployed, making it ideal for a little sleep at the DC fast charger. Because of the level floor stated earlier, the back seats are, to use Clint’s words, “heroic,” and they can slide and recline to prioritize luggage or passenger comfort. Speaking of luggage space, the Ioniq 5 has 27.2 cubic feet of space with the seats up and 59.3 with them folded down. Under that sloping hood is a little, 0.8 cubic foot frunk as well.

Volkswagen: The 2021 VW ID.4 clearly displays its Teutonic heritage with a strong, well-damped ride. Compared to the Ioniq 5, the ID.4 has significantly less isolation and has good body control on the majority of roads (with some unfortunate crash-through on others). On the interstate, there is a little bit more tire noise, and after an hour or two, the firm chairs start to feel a little shaky. Although there is enough of head and legroom for adjustment and stretching, the occupants in the rear seat must make due with a fixed seatback.

Compared to the Hyundai, the roomy, 30.3-cubic-foot cargo compartment is wider and deeper. When the back seats are folded, it grows to 64.2 cubic feet, making it ideal for the busy lifestyles that VW is trying to attract with the ID. Clint and I, however, aren’t traveling with any luggage, so we found the Hyundai to be much more comfortable than the Volkswagen.

Advantage: Hyundai

Hyundai: Like most Hyundai vehicles, the Ioniq 5 comes equipped as standard with a 12.3-inch touchscreen display and a 12.3-inch digital instrument cluster that are connected in a single rectangular monolith atop the dash. The infotainment software contains two changeable hard buttons for rapid access to your favorite features and logical menu layouts, and the white, gray, and light blue color scheme is stylish and modern. The digital cluster features other display options as well, including one with a ton of EV-specific data to assist you maximize your efficiency.

Hyundai continues to exclude wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto on its 12.3-inch screen, for unknown reasons. Additionally, the Ioniq lacks any USB-C connections, so if you want to use smartphone mirroring, be sure to have a USB-A cord on hand. Considering how futuristic the rest of the car appears, the omissions seem unexpectedly out-of-date.

Volkswagen: Let’s start with some positive news. The ID.4 makes entering and connecting to the outside world more simpler thanks to wireless smartphone mirroring, USB-C connections, and a wireless charging pad. The new infotainment system has a very appealing and high-definition look. The infotainment system’s and ambient lighting’s zone-reconfigurable color scheme is of particular interest to yours self. For a company that strives to be as youthful as Volkswagen, such a whimsical element is ideal.

Sadly, the rest of the infotainment system is inadequate. The touch screen responds slowly, which can cause the dreaded double-press if you’re impatient enough. Additionally, the menus’ disorganized layout makes seemingly simple operations like changing the radio require multiple steps. At least the technology allows for over-the-air updates, and VW is working to address customer concerns.

The trio of touch-sensitive sliders below the screen aren’t lighted, making it nearly difficult to use them to change the climate control setting at night. This is less simple to remedy and is really bothersome. When will the automotive industry understand that physical buttons and knobs are always preferable for one-time uses like these?

Performance

Hyundai: The Ioniq 5 has an electric motor on each axle when it is equipped with all-wheel drive, giving it a total of 320 horsepower and 446 pound-feet of torque. The Ioniq 5 will startle you with a powerful shove to the lower back as it speeds to 60 in less than 5 seconds if you’re not anticipating so much punch off the line. Along with the swift passing and merging performance we’ve come to expect from contemporary EVs, the acceleration doesn’t slow down at high speeds either.

Another surprise is the powerful I-Pedal regenerative brakes, which offer significant deceleration when the accelerator is lifted. If such robust energy recovery isn’t your cup of tea, steering-wheel paddles allow you choose between three milder degrees of regen or turn the system off entirely. I-Pedal, on the other hand, is simple to get used to because it moves gradually and linearly as you take off the accelerator — this is one-pedal driving done well.

The Ioniq 5 doesn’t handle well, with its light and unresponsive steering eliminating any possibility of having fun on a winding road. While the Hyundai EV crossover is certainly capable, with lots of grip and a tiny tendency toward safe understeer, doing so isn’t very enjoyable. I suppose that meager little problem will be resolved if the rumored Ioniq 5 N materializes the next year.

Volkswagen: Like the Hyundai, Volkswagen’s ID.4 has an all-wheel drive system and two motors, giving the EV a total of 295 horsepower and 339 pound-feet of torque. Even while it is a little slower than the swift Ioniq 5, VW claims that the 5.4-second sprint to 60 mph is still more than suitable for a family crossover. The ID.4 is still a competent, assured vehicle to drive in traffic, with adequate power delivery while navigating traffic or passing a left-lane hog.

The VW’s extra-regen “B” mode, which has progressively more deceleration the longer you leave your foot off the thin pedal, is activated by rotating the shift selector forward twice. The ID.4 doesn’t have a full one-pedal drive mode, unlike the Hyundai; it can only slow down but never stop fully. It’s unfortunate because so many EV drivers today demand this technology, but we believe Volkswagen’s strategy will be easier for beginners to understand.

Fortunately, the ID.4’s quick handling compensates for its slightly inferior energy recovery. The Volkswagen EV handles something like a plus-sized GTI and has better cornering balance and heavier steering than the Ioniq 5. The ID.4 is arguably the most entertaining vehicle in its class, barring perhaps the powerful Ford Mustang Mach-E. The hard ride pays off with a planted, confident sense on the road. You now have it. We chose the slower vehicle.

Advantage: Volkswagen

Safety

Hyundai: the entry-level Highway Driving Assist (HDA), which includes adaptive cruise control, automated emergency braking, lane departure warning, and lane centering, is a standard feature on the Hyundai Ioniq 5. The SEL and Limited trims offer HDA II, which helps the vehicle choose the safest position in the lane (rather than automatically selecting the center) by analyzing nearby vehicles and lane markings. Additionally, HDA II aids with lane changes. When you turn on the turn signal, the car waits for a space and, when it’s safe to do so, gently moves into the opposite lane. One of the greatest Level 2 driver assistance systems available, the system performs flawlessly.

The Ioniq 5 has not undergone any safety testing by the IIHS or the federal authorities. In contrast, the Hyundai EV sold in Europe received a five-star rating in the EuroNCAP test, which is quite comparable to the NHTSA’s.
Volkswagen: Volkswagen’s IQ is a feature that comes standard on every ID.4 model. Active safety and driving assistance technology from Drive. One of these is Travel Assist, a Level 2 semi-autonomous technology that combines lane centering and adaptive cruise control to lessen driver fatigue on freeways. In addition, there is Lane Assist, which offers blind-spot monitoring and automatically countersteers if the driver tries to change lanes when another car is already in the position. These operations are simple to use.

Volkswagen: Volkswagen’s IQ is a standard feature on every ID.4 variation.Active safety and driving assistance technology from Drive. One of these is Travel Assist, a Level 2 semi-autonomous technology that combines lane centering and adaptive cruise control to lessen driver fatigue on freeways. In addition, there is Lane Assist, which offers blind-spot monitoring and automatically countersteers if the driver tries to change lanes when another car is already in the position. These operations are simple to use.

The Volkswagen ID.4 received a Top Safety Pick+ certification from the IIHS, signifying the SUV’s exceptional crashworthiness and capacity to prevent rear-end collisions and lessen the severity of collisions with pedestrians and cyclists. The ID.4 received a five-star overall safety rating from the government as well. In terms of safety, the Hyundai and Volkswagen perform equally well.

Draw

Efficiency

Hyundai: According to the EPA, the 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5’s single motor can travel 303 miles on a single charge, but opting for dual-motor all-wheel drive reduces that distance to 256 miles. The Ioniq 5 can recharge at a maximum rate of 240 kilowatts when utilizing a DC fast charger, recharging its 77.4 kilowatt-hour battery from 10 to 80 percent in 18 minutes. The Ioniq 5 takes 6 hours and 43 minutes to charge from 10% to 100% on a more conventional 240-volt residential wall box. The Ioniq 5 gets 98 miles per gallon equivalent combined according to the EPA.

Volkswagen: The EPA estimates that the most fuel-efficient ID.4 variation will travel 260 miles in 2021, yet our ID.4 Pro S AWD was only given a rating of 240 miles. Sadly, the 2022 ID.4 was not yet available for testing, but a model similar to our topic would have a rating of 250 miles. The EPA estimates it at 93 mpge combined for our 2021. According to Volkswagen, a 125 kW DC fast charger can charge the Volkswagen from zero to eighty percent in around 38 minutes. The ID.4 may fill up at a home wall box in 7 hours, 30 minutes, from empty.

We have to give the Ioniq 5 credit for this one because of its far faster charging rate and greater overall EPA range.

The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 SE has a starting price of $44,000 plus $1,245 for destination, but our test vehicle was a fully loaded Limited AWD model with a $1,000 matte paint job and some floor mats. The Ioniq 5 isn’t cheap, with an as-tested MSRP of $56,920, but Hyundai offers a lot in return. The Limited (and the mid-tier SEL) come standard with the Highway Driving Assist II safety measures described earlier, as well as sporty 20-inch alloys, remote parking assistance, 80s-inspired LED projector headlights, and the crucial sliding center console within.

The Limited also receives some cool segment-exclusive features, such as vehicle-to-load charging, which enables you to use your car as a sizable battery backup, and a front seat designed like a lounge to assist the driver recharge while the car is being recharged. Additionally, the flagship Ioniq grade is the only one to have a head-up display, heated seats, Bose premium audio, and Hyundai’s NFC digital key; none of these features are offered on the ID.4. Even though the Ioniq 5 Limited costs about 57 grand, it’s a lot of vehicle.

The 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 SE has a starting price of $44,000 plus $1,245 for destination, but our test vehicle was a fully loaded Limited AWD model with a $1,000 matte paint job and some floor mats. The Ioniq 5 isn’t cheap, with an as-tested MSRP of $56,920, but Hyundai offers a lot in return. The Limited (and the mid-tier SEL) come standard with the Highway Driving Assist II safety measures described earlier, as well as sporty 20-inch alloys, remote parking assistance, 80s-inspired LED projector headlights, and the crucial sliding center console within.

The Limited also receives some cool segment-exclusive features, such as vehicle-to-load charging, which enables you to use your car as a sizable battery backup, and a front seat designed like a lounge to assist the driver recharge while the car is being recharged. Additionally, the flagship Ioniq grade is the only one to have a head-up display, heated seats, Bose premium audio, and Hyundai’s NFC digital key; none of these features are offered on the ID.4. Even though the Ioniq 5 Limited costs about 57 grand, it’s a lot of vehicle.

Verdict

It cannot be denied. Even if the Volkswagen ID.4 is excellent for most daily driving chores, it was obvious from the start that the Hyundai Ioniq 5 would win out. Although factors like range, charging speed, and performance played a major role in the choice, the Hyundai also won on a higher level because to its stylish design, textbook-ripping proportions, and swanky interior.

Nevertheless, many EV buyers will buy a VW ID.4 and have no problems at all, especially those who have charging infrastructure at home. With a 240-mile range, some owners may go a week or two without recharging thanks to its quick 240-volt charge time and access to less expensive off-peak electricity. Even with this disclaimer, though, Volkswagen still felt less polished than its South Korean counterpart due to its cheaper-feeling interior and annoying infotainment and climate controls.

The 2022 Ioniq 5 is a success for Hyundai. The quirky Ioniq 5 is a winner thanks to its lounge-like interior, unique yet endearing style, user-friendly range rating, and easy recharging at home or on the road.

Winner: Hyundai

Feature 2021 Volkswagen ID.4 Pro S AWD 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 Limited HTRAC
Battery 77.0-Kilowatt-Hour Lithium-Ion 77.4-Kilowatt-Hour Lithium-Ion
Motors Dual Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Dual Permanent-Magnet Synchronous
Output 295 Horsepower / 339 Pound-Feet 320 Horsepower / 446 Pound-Feet
Range 240 Miles 256 Miles
DC Fast Charge Rate 125 Kilowatts 240 Kilowatts
DC Charge Time 10-80% 38 Minutes 18 Minutes
AC Charge Time, 240V 10-100% 7 Hours 30 Minutes 6 Hours 43 Minutes
Weight 4,888 Pounds 4,662 Pounds
Seating Capacity 5 5
Cargo Volume 30.3 / 64.2 Cubic Feet 27.2 / 59.3 + 0.8 Cubic Feet
Towing 2,700 Pounds 1,650 Pounds
Base Price $41,230 + $1,195 Destination $44,000 + $1,245 Destination
Trim Base Price $49,370 $52,345
As-Tested Price $50,870 $56,920

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